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On this day, In 1970 Doug Sanders gets a win of sweet redemption at the Bahamas Island Open Classic

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After heartbreak at St. Andrews, Doug Sanders finally got redemption in the Bahamas

The 1970 British Open and the 1970 Bahamas Island Classic…Two different climates, two different results.  The 1970 Open Championship will always be synonymous with Doug Sanders name.  After a heartbreaking loss in any regard, its near impossible to bounce back from defeat.  Defeated indeed was Sanders at the 1970 Open Championship missing a 3 foot putt for the win.  Although maybe he beat himself, its never unnerving having Jack Nicklaus charging at your back.  He says this quote when asked about the putt,”(Walter)Hagen said that no-one remembers who finished second. But they still ask me if I ever think about that putt I missed to win the 1970 Open at St. Andrews. I tell them that some times it doesn’t cross my mind for a full five minutes.” (see missed putt below)

5 New Metalwoods That Offer Forgiveness

These metalwoods can fix your flaws

You might think that all metalwoods are designed to do the same thing: launch it high with low spin. In a way they are, but they go about it in different ways. The newest metalwoods target certain types of swings: (1) big hitters who need shots to launch with less spin; (2) slower swingers who need more clubhead speed; and (3) hitters who need a straighter ball flight. Whether it’s less weight or redistributed internal mass, most new metalwoods are player-specific. So start your search knowing your weaknesses, and make a purchase based on how a new club can correct what’s wrong. Here are five fixes worth considering.

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TOUR EDGE EXOTICS CBX
Better players looking for a low-spin fairway wood might benefit from this construction. It includes a titanium face fused to a high-strength steel body. A lightweight carbon-composite piece in the rear of the sole allows more weight to be placed forward.

CALLAWAY GBB EPIC STAR
This ultralight driver is designed for golfers with slower swing speeds and features the same distance technology found in the standard Epic—including two rods that join the crown and sole to help the face flex across a larger area.

COBRA F-MAX
This fairway wood provides full service for the flaws of average golfers. Helpful features include a lighter swingweight, anti-slice bias, higher lofts and larger, more comfortable grips. A thin, high-strength steel face insert gives distance a boost.

TITLEIST 818 H1
The H2 is preferred by tour players, but the H1 here offers something for the rest of us. The latest version is more stable on off-center hits and is designed for golfers who hit their hybrids with more of a sweeping motion than a downward strike.

PING G400 SF TEC
We don’t just hit slices with our drivers, so the G400 line has a heel-weighted fairway-wood option. A high-strength steel face provides extra flexing for more distance, and the slightly larger head size offers forgiveness on mis-hits.

By 

Mike Stachura

On this day, In 1993 Nick Price wins the “Million Dollar Golf Challenge”

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Price won the Million Dollar Challenge while breaking the course record…

Zimbabwe’s Nick Price posted a 24-under-par total of 264 to win the Million Dollar Golf Challenge by a amazing 12 strokes at Sun City on Sunday December 5, 1993.  Price shot rounds of 67, 66, 66 and a course record-equalling 65 as he won the 1 million first prize for the first time.  His four-round total was a remarkable eight shots better than the record set by Germany’s Bernard Langer in 1991 when the German also set the course record of 65.

From disqualification to becoming the champion

The victory resonated on a whole different level with Price, who just a year earlier was DQ’d after he fails to sign his scorecard in protest.  The reason being as during the third round, Price’s caddie moved an advertisement which resulted in a two stroke penalty.  Second place went to fellow-Zimbabwean Mark McNulty, who finished on 276, 12 under par, after closing with a five-under-par 67. Langer claimed third place with a final round of 68 for a total of 279 while South Africa’s Fulton Allem returned the second best score of the day with a 66 to finish fourth on 280.

Price was 17 under and 10 shots clear at the end of the third round and began the final 18 holes in spectacular style with an eagle two at the first, holing his 125 yard approach.  Out in just 32, with birdies at five and seven, he then birdied three of the next four holes to go to 24-under for the tournament.  Price bogeyed the 16th, but a well-timed birdie three at the last in front of packed stands enabled him to finish in style.  Price has now won over 2.7 million US dollars for the year and only Australian Greg Norman has a slight chance of overtaking him at the Johnny Walker Classic later in December.

 

The Yips: “Once you’ve had em, you’ve got em…”

Many viewers of Tiger’s return (including his  former coach, Hank Haney ) observed his difficulty with a few “sticky” chips around the greens at the 2017 Hero World Challenge — it should be noted that other players did also have a similar problem dealing with the tight lies around the Albany greens, most notably Hideki Matsuyama. But Woods, who has had more consistent issues in the last few years, stubbed the ground behind the golf ball on a number of shots this week, and half-skulled a few others while trying to avoid the same result. We can pass it off as “rust,” but we have seen it from him before. So let’s talk about it for a bit.  The “yips,” as they are known, are one of the most frustrating problems that plague golfers, particularly professional golfers. The  physical  causes of the yips are well known; this is not some esoteric information known only to great players and coaches. We all know the  physical reasons, but the yips are not simply a physical problem. In fact, the physical might be a small part of the problem. The biggest part is the mental.  Everyone reading this has  yipped a chip , and we all know that the very next time that shot presents itself we are thinking about the yip. It’s difficult (if not impossible) to dismiss that last shot from the mind. And if it happens more than once, or more than few times, it might be  permanently  on one’s mind. That’s a huge problem if you play the game for a living. Brandel Chamblee, with whom I have publicly disagreed in the past, has a theory on this. He believes no great player has ever really gotten over the condition. I can’t say if that’s true or not, but it may be.  It’s been said, (I have read that Sam Snead might have said it first, but who knows where these things ever really come from) about the yips: “Once you’ve had ’em, you’ve got ’em.” How’s that for a scary thought? Who knows if it’s true, but one thing I do know is this; golf always seems to go for the jugular!  It seems as though every time I have ever stubbed a chip shot, very soon, if not the very next hole, I have to hit another chip from a tight lie. If I’ve just missed a short putt, very soon, if not the next hole, it also seems like I’ll knock it 5 feet past the hole. And what am I thinking about? You guessed it, the last missed short putt. So no amount of mental discipline seems to overcome these evil thoughts.  Hitting the ground behind the ball on a short shot is caused by one or any combinations of the following:  The leading edge of the wedge sticking in the ground  An early release with a closing face  Swaying off the ball  A path that is too inside-out (too far from the inside)  But as I noted, every tour player and coach KNOWS this all too well. The same player who once chipped in from behind the 16th green at Augusta with a Green Jacket on the line yipped some sticky chips last week. To me, that is not rust or a mechanical problem; it’s a mental one. I would like some professional psychologist or mind-discipline expert to chime in to advise all of us on how to overcome this problem. It’s easy enough to say: “Forget about it, stay present, play the shot at hand only.” But that seems almost impossible, or at the very least, difficult to do. “Don’t think about yipping this shot” is almost a sure fire way to do just that. It’s a vicious cycle.  If it’s on Tiger’s mind, the rest of us are in big trouble. Let’s hope Chamblee is wrong, but I have to wonder. Remember the down time in golf far exceeds any other game.  We are on the golf course 4+ hours, and in the act of swinging a club a total of only about two minutes. The rest of the time is thinking about swinging the club, and the outcomes. And unfortunately what we usually think about is the WORST shot we have hit in a situation, not the best. And when that shot is a short, chip from a tight-lie, well, that’s when the yips resurface.  The mechanical is correctable, but the mental is long-lasting.     By    Dennis Clark  

Many viewers of Tiger’s return (including his former coach, Hank Haney) observed his difficulty with a few “sticky” chips around the greens at the 2017 Hero World Challenge — it should be noted that other players did also have a similar problem dealing with the tight lies around the Albany greens, most notably Hideki Matsuyama. But Woods, who has had more consistent issues in the last few years, stubbed the ground behind the golf ball on a number of shots this week, and half-skulled a few others while trying to avoid the same result. We can pass it off as “rust,” but we have seen it from him before. So let’s talk about it for a bit.

The “yips,” as they are known, are one of the most frustrating problems that plague golfers, particularly professional golfers. The physical causes of the yips are well known; this is not some esoteric information known only to great players and coaches. We all know the physicalreasons, but the yips are not simply a physical problem. In fact, the physical might be a small part of the problem. The biggest part is the mental.

Everyone reading this has yipped a chip, and we all know that the very next time that shot presents itself we are thinking about the yip. It’s difficult (if not impossible) to dismiss that last shot from the mind. And if it happens more than once, or more than few times, it might be permanently on one’s mind. That’s a huge problem if you play the game for a living. Brandel Chamblee, with whom I have publicly disagreed in the past, has a theory on this. He believes no great player has ever really gotten over the condition. I can’t say if that’s true or not, but it may be.

It’s been said, (I have read that Sam Snead might have said it first, but who knows where these things ever really come from) about the yips: “Once you’ve had ’em, you’ve got ’em.” How’s that for a scary thought? Who knows if it’s true, but one thing I do know is this; golf always seems to go for the jugular!

It seems as though every time I have ever stubbed a chip shot, very soon, if not the very next hole, I have to hit another chip from a tight lie. If I’ve just missed a short putt, very soon, if not the next hole, it also seems like I’ll knock it 5 feet past the hole. And what am I thinking about? You guessed it, the last missed short putt. So no amount of mental discipline seems to overcome these evil thoughts.

Hitting the ground behind the ball on a short shot is caused by one or any combinations of the following:

The leading edge of the wedge sticking in the ground

An early release with a closing face

Swaying off the ball

A path that is too inside-out (too far from the inside)

But as I noted, every tour player and coach KNOWS this all too well. The same player who once chipped in from behind the 16th green at Augusta with a Green Jacket on the line yipped some sticky chips last week. To me, that is not rust or a mechanical problem; it’s a mental one. I would like some professional psychologist or mind-discipline expert to chime in to advise all of us on how to overcome this problem. It’s easy enough to say: “Forget about it, stay present, play the shot at hand only.” But that seems almost impossible, or at the very least, difficult to do. “Don’t think about yipping this shot” is almost a sure fire way to do just that. It’s a vicious cycle.

If it’s on Tiger’s mind, the rest of us are in big trouble. Let’s hope Chamblee is wrong, but I have to wonder. Remember the down time in golf far exceeds any other game.  We are on the golf course 4+ hours, and in the act of swinging a club a total of only about two minutes. The rest of the time is thinking about swinging the club, and the outcomes. And unfortunately what we usually think about is the WORST shot we have hit in a situation, not the best. And when that shot is a short, chip from a tight-lie, well, that’s when the yips resurface.

The mechanical is correctable, but the mental is long-lasting.

 

By

 Dennis Clark